Association between alcohol consumption and dietary supplement intake of students from the University of Sarajevo

  • Nafija Serdarević Institute for Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology, Clinical Center University of Sarajevo and Faculty of Health Studies, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7977-9819
  • Arzija Pašalić Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Eldina Smječanin Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4482-5381
  • Vedran Đido Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7277-9952
  • Refet Gojak Infectology Clinic, Clinical Center University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Muris Pecar Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2257-5406
  • Fatima Jusupović Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Dijana Avdić Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Namik Trtak Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Eldad Kaljić Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8020-1029
  • Amila Jaganjac Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Bakir Katana Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7349-5890
  • Samir Bojičić Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Suada Branković Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Jasmina Mahmutović Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Amra Mačak Hadžiomerović Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Gordana Manić Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Redžo Čaušević Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Adnan Šehić Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2960-3801
  • Ema Gojak Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Almedina Hajrović Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Amela Salihović Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Minela Husejinović Velagić Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5713-7919
  • Ehlimana Pecar Health Center Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6838-4878
  • Deni Selimović Private Practice “Praxis” Dr. Pecar, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8659-7260
Keywords: folate, vitamin B, multivitamins, minerals, students

Abstract

Introduction: Dietary supplements are an important source of vitamins and minerals that may help prevent several disease-causing biological pathways involved in one-carbon metabolism, including the suppression of cell proliferation, oxidative stress, nitric oxide synthesis, and angiogenesis. The present study aimed to assess the association between the intake of folate, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, and minerals and the consumption of alcohol among university students.

Methods: This study was participated by students aged 19-22 years from the University of Sarajevo between 2017 and 2018. Using a questionnaire, we interviewed in a week them to collect information regarding age, socio-economic status, alcohol consumption, and dietary supplement intake. Then, we investigated the association between the baseline intake of folate, B vitamins, and minerals and that of alcohol consumption.

Results: Most students consumed Vitamin B supplements (32%) and folic acid (10%). Dietary multivitamins and minerals were less prevalent in more than a year, accounting for 186 (23.9%) and 174 (24.3%) students, respectively, than those in less than a year. In a year, <20% of students consumed multivitamins 129 (16.6%) and minerals 116 (15.3%). Meanwhile, 256 (27.1%) students consumed alcohol. The Chi-square test of independence showed that drinking habits and the intake of such dietary supplements had no association (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: An extremely low percentage of the participating students in Canton Sarajevo used dietary supplements of Vitamin B, folate, multivitamins, and minerals. Moreover, alcohol consumption and dietary supplement intake were not associated. Further research is needed to establish the best cost-effective public health system to achieve a sufficient intake of dietary supplements.

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Published
2019-04-30
How to Cite
Serdarević, N., Pašalić, A., Smječanin, E., Đido, V., Gojak, R., Pecar, M., Jusupović, F., Avdić, D., Trtak, N., Kaljić, E., Jaganjac, A., Katana, B., Bojičić, S., Branković, S., Mahmutović, J., Mačak Hadžiomerović, A., Manić, G., Čaušević, R., Šehić, A., Gojak, E., Hajrović, A., Salihović, A., Husejinović Velagić, M., Pecar, E., & Selimović, D. (2019). Association between alcohol consumption and dietary supplement intake of students from the University of Sarajevo. Journal of Health Sciences, 9(1), 17-22. https://doi.org/10.17532/jhsci.2019.869
Section
Research articles

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