Clinical and radiologic features in patients with the WHO grade I and II meningiomas

Authors

  • Haso Sefo Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Center University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Bekir Rovčanin Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Center University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7298-3240
  • Džan Ahmed Jesenković Department for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7238-7687
  • Melika Džeko Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0009-0002-3186-8825
  • Amra Avdić Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0009-0001-5263-2830
  • Adi Ahmetspahić Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1599-1807
  • Ibrahim Omerhodžić Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Center University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5143-8801
  • Ermin Hadžić Department of Neurosurgery, Cantonal Hospital “dr. Safet Mujić”, Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5072-0095
  • Hadžan Konjo Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Studies, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7443-6320

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17532/jhs.2024.2564

Keywords:

Meningioma, World Health Organization, pre-operative indicator, grade

Abstract

Introduction: Meningiomas are the most common benign tumor of the central nervous system, accounting for 53.3% and 37.6% of all central nervous system tumors (1). The World Health Organization (WHO) Grade I meningiomas account for 80.5% of all meningiomas and are considered benign meningiomas; the WHO Grade II meningiomas account for 17.7% of all meningiomas and exhibit more aggressive behavior.

Methods: In the period 2015-2022, a retrospective single-center study at the clinic of neurosurgery at the Clinical Center University of Sarajevo was conducted, which included patients with a pathohistological finding of WHO Grade I or II meningioma. Depending on the pathohistological grade of the tumor, patients were divided into two groups: Grade I and Grade II patients. Patients were examined clinically and radiologically. Clinical data collected included in the study: Gender, age, number of symptoms before surgery, whether patients were symptomatic or asymptomatic, pre-operative Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group,and Karnopsky performance scale. Pre-operative contrast magnetic resonance imaging of the head measured tumor volume, temporal muscle thickness (TMT), sagittal midline shift, and surrounding cerebral edema.

Results: A total of 80 patients were enrolled in the study, 68 with WHO Grade I and 12 with WHO Grade II meningiomas. We found that patients with Grade I meningioma were younger and that the mean thickness of the temporal muscle was statistically thicker than in patients with Grade II. Increasing TMT was significantly and positively associated with Grade I tumors and negatively associated with Grade II tumors (p = 0.032).

Conclusion: This study demonstrates that TMT can serve as a radiologic pre-operative indicator of meningioma grade and provide valuable guidance to neurosurgeons in surgical planning. Further studies are needed to validate these results.


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Published

15.05.2024

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Research articles

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How to Cite

1.
Clinical and radiologic features in patients with the WHO grade I and II meningiomas. JHSCI [Internet]. 2024 May 15 [cited 2024 Jun. 18];14(1):51-5. Available from: https://www.jhsci.ba/ojs/index.php/jhsci/article/view/2564