Analysis of Delphinidin and Luteolin Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocyte Culture

  • Jasmin Ezić Institute for genetic engineering and biotechnology, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Amina Kugić Institute for genetic engineering and biotechnology, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Maida Hadžić Institute for genetic engineering and biotechnology, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Anja Haverić Institute for genetic engineering and biotechnology, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Kasim Bajrović Institute for genetic engineering and biotechnology, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Sanin Haverić Institute for genetic engineering and biotechnology, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Abstract

Introduction: Bioflavonoids delphinidin (2-(3,4,5-Trihydroxyphenyl)chromenylium-3,5,7-triol) and luteolin (2-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl)-5,7-dihydroxy-4-chromenone) have been recognized as promising antioxidants and anticancer substances. Due to their extensive use, the goal of the research was to determine whether they have any genotoxic potential in vitro.

Methods: Analysis of genotoxic potential was performed applying chromosome aberrations test in human lymphocyte culture, as this kind of research was not conducted abundantly for these two bioflavonoids. Delphinidin and luteolin were dissolved in DMSO and added to cultures in final concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 μM.

Results: In human lymphocytes cultures Delphinidin induced PCDs in all treatments, potentially affecting the cell cycle and topoisomerase II activity. In concentration of 50 μM luteolin showed strong genotoxic effects and caused significant reduction of cell proliferation.

Conclusion: Luteolin exhibited certain genotoxic and cytostatic potential. Delphinidin was not considered genotoxic, however its impact on mitosis, especially topoisomerase II activity, was revealed.

References

1. Feng R, Wang SY, Shi YH, Fan J, Yin XM. Delphinidin induces necrosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells in the presence of 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2010;58(7):3957-64. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf9025458

2. Patel K, Jain A, Patel DK. Medicinal significance, pharmacological activities, and analytical aspects of anthocyanidins ‘delphinidin’: A concise report. Journal of Acute Disease. 2013;2(3):169-78. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2221-6189(13)60123-7

3. Azevedo L, Alves de Lima PL, Gomes JC, Stringheta PC, Ribeiro DA, Salvadori DM. Differential response related to genotoxicity between eggplant (Solanum melanogena) skin aqueous extract and its main purified anthocyanin (delphinidin) in vivo. Food Chem. Toxicol. 2007;45(5):852-58. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2006.11.004

4. Lazzé MC, Savio M, Pizzala R, Cazzalini O, Perucca P, Scovassi AI, et al. Anthocyanins induce cell cycle perturbations and apoptosis in different human cell lines. Carcinogenesis. 2004;25(8):1427-33. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgh138

5. Lamy S, Blanchette M, Michaud-Levesque J, Lafleur R, Durocher Y, Moghrabi A, et al. Delphinidin, a dietary anthocyanidin, inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation. Carcinogenesis. 2006;27(5):989-96. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgi279

6. Hafeez BB, Siddiqui IA, Asim M, Malik A, Afaq F, Adhami VM, et al. A dietary anthocyanidin delphinidin induces apoptosis of human prostate cancer pc3 cells in vitro and in vivo: involvement of nuclear factor-κb signaling. Cancer Res. 2008;68(20):8564-72. http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-08-2232

7. Resende FA, Vilegas W, Dos Santos LC, Varanda EA. Mutagenicity of flavonoids assayed by bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) test. Molecules. 2012;17(5):5255-68. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules17055255

8. Nijveldt RJ, van Nood E, van Hoorn DE, Boelens PG, van Norren K, van Leeuwen PA. Flavonoids: a review of probable mechanisms of action and potential applications. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2001;74(4):418-25.

9. Seelinger G, Merfort I, Wölfle U, Schempp CM. Anti-carcinogenic effect of the flavonoid luteolin. Molecules. 2008;13(10):2628-51. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules13102628

10. Lin Y, Shi R, Wang X, Shen HM. Luteolin, a flavonoid with potential for cancer prevention and therapy. Curr. Cancer Drug Targets. 2008;8(7):634-46. http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/156800908786241050

11. Casagrande F, Darbon JM. Effects of structurally related flavonoids on cell cycle progression of human melanoma cells: regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases CDK2 and CDK1. Biochem Pharmacol. 2001;61(10):1205–1215. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0006-2952(01)00583-4

12. Cantero G, Campanella C, Mateos S, Cortés F. Topoisomerase II inhibition and high yield of endoreduplication induced by the bioflavonoids luteolin and quercetin. Mutagenesis. 2006;21(5):321-5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/mutage/gel033

13. Esselen M, Fritz J, Hutter M, Marko D. Delphinidin modulates the DNA-damaging properties of topoisomerase II poisons. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 2009;22(3):554-64. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/tx800293v

14. Mitelman F, Mertens F, Johansson B. A breakpoint map of recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in human neoplasia. Nat. Genet. 1997;15:417–74. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng0497supp-417

15. Fimognari C, Berti F, Cantelli-Forti G, Hrelia P. Effect of cyanidin 3-O-beta glucopyranoside on micronucleus induction in cultured human lymphocytes by fourdifferent mutagens. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 2004;43(1):45-52. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/em.10212

16. Stopper H, Schmitt E, Kobras K. Genotoxicity of phytoestrogens. Mutat. Res. 2005;574(1-2):139-55. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mrfmmm.2005.01.029

17. Major J. Cytogenetic biomarkers applied for occupational cancer risk assessment. Doctoral dissertation. Budapest: Semmelweis University. 2008.

18. Hadžić M, Haverić S, Haverić A, Galić B. Inhibitory effects of delphinidin and luteolin on genotoxicity induced by K2(B3O3F4OH) in human lymphocytes in vitro. Biologia. 2015;70(4):553-58. http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/biolog-2015-0066

19. Hagmar L, Strömberg U, Bonassi S, Hansteen IL, Knudsen LE, Lindholm C, et al. Impact of types of lymphocyte chromosomal aberrations on human cancer risk: results from Nordic and Italian cohorts. Cancer Res. 2004;64(6):2258-63. http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-03-3360

20. Sudhakar R, Ninge Gowda KN, Venu G. Mitotic abnormalities induced by silk dyeing industry effluents in the cell of Allium cepa. Cytologia. 2001;66:235-39. http://dx.doi.org/10.1508/cytologia.66.235

21. Çelik TA, Aslantürk ÖS. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Inula viscosa Leaf Extracts with Allium Test. J. Biomed. Biotechnol. 2010; Article ID:189252; http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/189252
Published
2015-08-26
How to Cite
EZIĆ, Jasmin et al. Analysis of Delphinidin and Luteolin Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocyte Culture. Journal of Health Sciences, [S.l.], v. 5, n. 2, p. 41-45, aug. 2015. ISSN 1986-8049. Available at: <http://www.jhsci.ba/OJS/index.php/jhsci/article/view/248>. Date accessed: 20 oct. 2018. doi: https://doi.org/10.17532/jhsci.2015.248.
Section
Research articles

Keywords

Chromosome aberrations, cell proliferation, bioflavonoides.
Bookmark and Share